Skip to Content

Logistics – How do you actually live in an RV full-time?

Logistics – How do you actually live in an RV full-time?
We had a question from one of our followers about how we plan to live in an RV full time. This is a VERY high-level overview of what our new lifestyle will consist of.
 

 
 

Our New LIFESTYLE:

 “Water & electric, and a place to drain the septic…”
~Kacey Musgraves, 
“My House”

  • Drive our house to wherever we want to go
  • Park (with 40ft behind us, this *may occasionally* be a trick!)
  • Plug in our house – if not available at the site, use generator or solar power for electricity needs
  • Hook up our septic drain – if not available at site, monitor “fullness” and empty when needed at dump stations typically found at most campgrounds)
  • Hook up our water – if not available, we have to fill up our 100 gallon water tank at a water station typically found at most campgrounds
  • Extend the slide outs and awnings
  • Set up our “front yard”
  • Live and explore from our new place for a while!

 

 

Where? 

1) RV Parks/Campgrounds – from wooded parks to parking lots with water and electric hookups
2) Farms/Wineries – enter Harvest Hosts, a network of wineries, farms, and agri-tourism sites that invite self-contained RVers to visit and stay overnight for free!
The program is about having unique experiences and supporting local business, not just free camping.
3) Boondocking/Wild Camping on public land – terms used for “off-grid” camping or “roughing it” – no hookups or amenities. So you need to either have a generator or solar energy if you want to have power, and you have to consider the place to drain the septic…which you can usually dump at a nearby park for a nominal fee. Some RVers use composting toilets to enable even more off-grid time.
4) “Driveway Surfing” – visiting friends and family along the way, and hopefully being able to stay in their driveways for a while 🙂 There is also Boondockers Welcome so you can park in “new friends'” driveways.
5) “Parking Lot Surfing” – Probably not the most ideal option, but will work for quick over-nights or to check out a location before committing to a campground/other arrangement. Includes Wal-marts, truck stops, rest stops, and other business or parking lots that will give permission.
 
 

Costs  $$$$

1) Daily rates – Campgrounds can run from $15/day to upwards of $60+/day. Rate generally more over the weekends, and especially over holidays.  
2) Long-term camping rates – from season passes to monthly and yearly rates that are far cheaper than the daily rates.
3) Workamping/volunteer – There are many opportunities that provide afree/discounted campsite in return for a given minimal number of work hours. Can range from nature preservation,  to camp hosting, orcleaning the bathrooms.
4) Other free camping – Harvest Hosts, public land boon docking, etc – we are going to be doing this whenever we can! (granted we can get an internet connection 🙂 )  
5) Clubs – Camping clubs that offer membership camping and discounted rates for a yearly subscription.

 

If we really do it right, we’ve heard of full-timers getting their “lodging” for as little as $500/year! Worst case scenario, we could end up spending $60+/night.

Luckily, the choice is completely up to us: if we are looking to cut back on our expenses one month, we will be looking into the Harvest Hosts and public lands, consciously making the decisions to be on-the-road more and make it work off-grid. Conversely, if things are going really well and we want to sit back and enjoy ourselves in a luxurious park with full-hookups for a month, we can do that too!

Become A Mortons On The Move Insider

Join 10,000+ other adventurers to receive educating, entertaining, and inspiring articles about RV Travel Destinations, RV Gear, and Off-Grid Living to jump-start your adventures today!

About Mortons on the Move

Tom & Caitlin Morton of Mortons on the Move gave up the stationary life for one where they are constantly on the move. They are full-time travelers, television hosts, and digital media producers.
They left their jobs, sold their house and possessions, and hit the road in September 2015 in their full-time “home on wheels”. Since then they have traveled the US, Canada, and even internationally by RV.
Now, they are Discovery Channel & PBS TV Co-stars of The RVers, producers of “Go North” on Amazon Prime, co-founders and instructors of RV Masterclass, and contributing authors for Hwy.co and an Arizona travel guide.

About Us

Sharing is caring!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Travel

Saturday 4th of May 2019

Keep your work up. Your work is very great. I love your work. This is a VERY high-level overview of what our new lifestyle will consist of. Lovely post.

kayak swamp tours new orleans louisiana

Wednesday 9th of January 2019

Traveling is also a source of the enjoyment and pleasure.Traveling is a wonderful hobby for million of the people across the globe.This also provide a various advantages.Traveling is one activity that individual undertake at one time or the other in a life.It does not matter that what purpose of the travel is or what the travel is local or international.A lot of people actually look forward to traveling to the other parts of the worlds for various reason and purpose.

Dick and Joanna McNally

Friday 8th of January 2016

Saw your rig in the park.(Orlando). We are in G57 with the Bighorn and blue RAM 2500. 3 years full time (thank God for Thousand Trails!!) Retired since 2010. REASON We wanted to follow 70 Degrees up and down the East Coast We did that! Next we are headed Out West! Stop over and see us! We'll swap stories!! Dick and Joanna McNally

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.